Tuesday, April 26, 2011

25th Anniversary of Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster | NUCLEAR "SAFTEY" = NUCLEAR THREAT


Fukushima Update for 4/26/11 below
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25th Anniversary of Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster

GABRIELA BULISOVA photo -
Chernobyl Children International


It was 25 years ago today when a deadly explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the former Soviet state of Ukraine led to what was then the worst nuclear disaster in history. It sent a cloud of radioactive fallout into Russia, Belarus and over a large portion of Europe.


All nuclear reactors and their waste should be declared illegal, and can be considered crimes against humanity and the ecosphere - all governments and corporations and their officers should be made directly liable for the immediate decommissioning of all nuclear power plants, and for the security, clean up and management of the eternal quagmire of nuclear waste that they have created.

see also: Nuclear Power = Crime Against Humanity | whats up: Nuclear Power Crimes Against Humanity & Environment



Chernobyl nuclear reactor after the disaster. Reactor 4 (center). Turbine building (lower left). Reactor 3 (center right).
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons

Chernobyl Disaster @Wikipedia -
The Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukrainian SSR (now Ukraine). An explosion and fire released large quantities of radioactive contamination into the atmosphere, which spread over much of Western Russia and Europe. It is considered the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale (the other being the Fukushima I nuclear incident, which is considered far less serious and has caused no direct deaths).[1] The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles, crippling the Soviet economy.[2]

The disaster began during a systems test on 26 April 1986 at reactor number four of the Chernobyl plant, which is near the town of Pripyat. There was a sudden power output surge, and when an emergency shutdown was attempted, a more extreme spike in power output occurred, which led to a reactor vessel rupture and a series of explosions. These events exposed the graphite moderator of the reactor to air, causing it to ignite.[3] The resulting fire sent a plume of highly radioactive smoke fallout into the atmosphere and over an extensive geographical area, including Pripyat. The plume drifted over large parts of the western Soviet Union and Europe. From 1986 to 2000, 350,400 people were evacuated and resettled from the most severely contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine.[4][5] According to official post-Soviet data,[6][7] about 60% of the fallout landed in Belarus.

The accident raised concerns about the safety of the Soviet nuclear power industry, as well as nuclear power in general, slowing its expansion for a number of years and forcing the Soviet government to become less secretive about its procedures.[8][notes 1]

Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus have been burdened with the continuing and substantial decontamination and health care costs of the Chernobyl accident. Thirty one deaths are directly attributed to the accident, all among the reactor staff and emergency workers.[9] A UNSCEAR report places the total confirmed deaths from radiation at 64 as of 2008. Estimates of the number of deaths potentially resulting from the accident vary enormously: the World Health Organization (WHO) suggest it could reach 4,000;[10] a Greenpeace report puts this figure at 200,000 or more;[11] a Russian publication, Chernobyl, concludes that 985,000 excess deaths occurred between 1986 and 2004 as a result of radioactive contamination.[12]



Chernobyl Catastrophe: Democracy Now! Reports on 25th Anniversary of Worst Nuclear Accident


Chernobyl Catastrophe: Democracy Now! Reports on 25th Anniversary of Worst Nuclear Accident. 1 of 2

As Japan continues to deal with its nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power facility, memorials are being held in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia today to mark the 25th anniversary of the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl. On April 26, 1986, an explosion at the power plant sent a cloud of radioactive fallout into Russia, Belarus and over a large portion of Europe. Soviet officials attempted to cover up the accident, but eventually 50,000 people living in Chernobyl’s immediate surroundings had to be evacuated. A vast rural region near the plant remains uninhabitable. Until the crisis in Japan, Chernobyl was the world’s only Level 7 "major accident" nuclear disaster, the most severe designation issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. [includes rush transcript]


Chernobyl Catastrophe: Democracy Now! Reports on 25th Anniversary of Worst Nuclear Accident. 2 of 2

AMY GOODMAN: "It was 25 years ago today when a deadly explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the former Soviet state of Ukraine led to what was then the worst nuclear disaster in history. It sent a cloud of radioactive fallout into Russia, Belarus and over a large portion of Europe. Fifty thousand people living in Chernobyl’s immediate surroundings had to be evacuated. A vast rural region became uninhabitable, and public authorities were forced to put restrictions on the sale and import of food to reduce the risk of radiation-induced cancer deaths among their populations.

"Children born in the plant’s vicinity continue experiencing high levels of birth defects, especially severe brain damage. In this clip from the 2003 documentary Chernobyl Heart, a nurse at a children’s care facility applies medication to the severely infected and mutated hands of a little boy..."

"A full quarter of a century after Chernobyl, the world is faced with a new nuclear catastrophe, this time in Japan.

"To discuss further what took place 25 years ago, we’re joined by Dr. Janette Sherman. She edited the book Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and Nature. She’s joining us from Arlington, Virginia, joining us from PBS station WETA.

"We’re also joined by Dr. Jeff Patterson. He’s the immediate past president of Physicians for Social Responsibility. He visited Chernobyl after the disaster. He joins us from Washington, D.C."

more: Chernobyl Catastrophe: Democracy Now! Reports on 25th Anniversary of Worst Nuclear Accident

Democracy NOW!
Democracy Now! - Japan in Crisis
DN! on YouTube - Japan in Crisis





Chernobyl: A Million Casualties
EnviroVideo presents Enviro Close-UP with Karl Grossman


A million people have died so far as a result of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant accident, explains Janette Sherman, M.D., toxicologist and contributing editor of the book Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment. Published by the New York Academy of Sciences, the book, authored by Dr. Alexey Yablokov, Dr. Vassily Nesterenko and Dr. Alexey Nesterenko, examined medical records now available--which expose as a lie the claim of the International Atomic Energy Commission that perhaps 4,000 people may die as a result of Chernobyl. Enviro Close-Up # 610 (29 mintes)



Best Chernobyl Documentary 2006 The Battle of Chernobyl (HQ) 1hr 32min 1 clip - YouTube

THE BATTLE OF CHERNOBYL dramatically chronicles the series of harrowing efforts to stop the nuclear chain reaction and prevent a second explosion, to "liquidate" the radioactivity, and to seal off the ruined reactor under a mammoth "sarcophagus." These nerve-racking events are recounted through newly available films, videos and photos taken in and around the plant, computer animation, and interviews with participants and eyewitnesses, many of whom were exposed to radiation, including government and military leaders, scientists, workers, journalists, doctors, and Pripyat refugees.

The consequences of this catastrophe continue today, with thousands of disabled survivors suffering from the "Chernobyl syndrome" of radiation-related illnesses, and the urgent need to replace the hastily-constructed and now crumbling sarcophagus over the still-contaminated reactor. As this remarkable film makes clear, THE BATTLE OF CHERNOBYL is far from over.



Anti-Nuclear Rally in Japan on Chernobyl Anniversary



NTD Television: About 100 protesters held candles on the doorstep of Tokyo Electric Power Company's headquarters on Tuesday as part of the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster.

The anniversary was especially significant for Japan this year, as a devastating earthquake and tsunami struck the country last month, smashing TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

One protester expressed concern over the safety of other nuclear power plants in the country.

[Ryouta Souno, Protester]:
"First of all, the most dangerous nuclear plants in Japan are Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant in Shizuoka prefecture, and Kashiwazaki Nuclear Power Plant in Niigata prefecture. If there is an earthquake, both of them will cause a serious accident like that of Fukushima. This can happen anytime, and it is absolutely crazy not to stop it.”

Others say the government has not been truthful about health hazards, especially the effects on children.

[Nanoha Otake, Nursery School Teacher]:
"The government has promoted nuclear power plants, and that led to an accident, and the children of Fukushima prefecture are suffering as a result, and I absolutely cannot trust the government.”

Protesters pleaded for the immediate shutdown of all of TEPCO's nuclear plants.

TEPCO wants a "cold shutdown" of the Fukushima plant within six to nine months; a timeline experts say will be tough to meet.



{graphic content - PARENTAL ADVISORY}

Miraho -Nie chcemy atomu (DiesProduction).avi

We do not want atomic

what's on your mind?




Annya's story - a Chernobyl legacy




Chernobyl Charity Groups


A video dedicated to those still suffering from the Chernobyl disaster.

chernobyl-international.com
chernobyl.org
childrenofchernobyl.org
focc.org.uk




FUKUSHIMA UPDATE +++ more on CHERNOBYL follows +++


IAEA Updates on Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

from IAEA Briefing on Fukushima Nuclear Accident (26 April 2011, 18:00 UTC) -

Management of on-site contaminated water

According to the 25 April evaluation by NISA of the report submitted by TEPCO, there is a little less than 70,000 tonnes of stagnant water with high level radioactivity in the basement of the turbine buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3.

Status of Reactors 1 - 4 (units 5 and 6 are stable and undamaged)

Plant status

On 25 April the power supply for the temporary electrical pumps that supply water to the reactor pressure vessel of Units 1, 2 and 3 was switched from the off-site power supply to temporary diesel generators to allow work to enhance the off-site supply.

White smoke continues to be emitted from Units 2, 3 and 4.

In Unit 1 fresh water is being continuously injected into the reactor pressure vessel through the feedwater line at an indicated flow rate of 6 m3/h using a temporary electric pump with off-site power.

In Unit 2 and Unit 3 fresh water is being continuously injected into the reactor pressure vessel through the fire extinguisher line at an indicated rate of 7 m3/h using temporary electric pumps with off-site power.

In Unit 4 140 tonnes of fresh water was sprayed over the spent fuel pool on 23 April and 165 tonnes of fresh water was sprayed over the spent fuel pool on 24 April using a concrete pump truck. The nuclear emergency response headquarters reported that temperature measurements showed the spent fuel pool temperature to be 83 °C before spraying and 66 °C after spraying on 23 April, and the spent fuel pool temperature to be 86 °C before spraying and 81 °C after spraying on 24 April.

Nitrogen gas is being injected into the containment vessel in Unit 1 to reduce the possibility of hydrogen combustion in the containment vessel. The pressure in the reactor pressure vessel is increasing.

The reactor pressure vessel temperatures in Unit 1 remain above cold shutdown conditions. The indicated temperature at the feedwater nozzle of the reactor pressure vessel is 138 °C and at the bottom of reactor pressure vessel is 111 °C.

The reactor pressure vessel temperatures in Unit 2 remain above cold shutdown conditions. The indicated temperature at the feed water nozzle of the reactor pressure vessel is 123 °C. The reactor pressure vessel and the dry well remain at atmospheric pressure. Fresh water injection (approximately 38 tonnes) to the spent fuel pool via the spent fuel pool cooling line was carried out on 25 April.

The temperature at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in Unit 3 remains above cold shutdown conditions. The indicated temperature at the feed water nozzle of the reactor pressure vessel is 75 °C and at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel is 111 °C. The reactor pressure vessel and the dry well remain at atmospheric pressure.

There has been no change in the status in Unit 5 or Unit 6 or in the common spent fuel storage facility.

Radiation monitoring

For the period 21-25 April deposition of I-131 was detected in eight prefectures, ranging from 2.2 to 37 Bq/m2. Deposition of Cs-137 was detected in 11 prefectures, the values reported ranging from 1.3 to 69 Bq/m2.

Gamma dose rates are measured daily in all 47 prefectures. For Fukushima prefecture gamma dose rates decreased from 1.9 μSv/h on 21 April to 1.7 μSv/h on 23 April. In Ibaraki prefecture, gamma dose rates were 0.12 μSv/h. In all other prefectures, reported gamma dose rates were below 0.1 μSv/h with similar decreasing trends.

Gamma dose rates reported specifically for the eastern part of Fukushima prefecture, for distances beyond 30 km from Fukushima Dai-ichi, showed a similar general decreasing tendency, ranging from 0.1 to 19.4 μSv/h on 25 April. The latest maximum reported value for 20 April was 24 μSv/h.

The other 45 prefectures presented gamma dose rates of below 0.1 μSv/h, falling within the local natural background range.

In drinking water, I-131 or Cs-137 is detectable, but in only a few prefectures. As of 1 April, the one remaining restriction on the consumption of drinking water relating to I-131 (at a level of 100 Bq/L) applies to only one village in the Fukushima prefecture, and the restriction applies only to infants.



Radiation effects from Fukushima I nuclear accidents

Fukushima dose rate comparison to other incidents and standards, with graph of recorded radiation levels and specific accident events from 11 to 30 March.
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia -

The radiation effects from the Fukushima I nuclear accidents are the results of release of radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Radioactive material was released on several occasions after the tsunami struck. This occurred due to both deliberate pressure-reducing venting, and through accidental and uncontrolled releases. These conditions resulted in minor amounts of radioactive contamination in the air, in drinking water, milk and on certain crops in the vicinity of the prefectures closest to the plant, and in fish caught 50 miles off the coast. Drinking water was above the limit for infants for several days in the second week after the accident. Several workers received more dosages of over 100 millisievert (mSv) while working on the plant site with two of them hospitalized with high exposures around the ankles after standing in radioactive cooling water. Water levels within units 2 and 3 (but outside the containment) were reported to be very high at "over 1000" and 750 mSv/h on 27 March.[1][2]
more  



NUCLEAR "SAFTEY" = NUCLEAR THREAT

All nuclear reactors and their waste should be declared illegal, and can be considered crimes against humanity and the ecosphere - all governments and corporations and their officers should be made directly liable for the immediate decommissioning of all nuclear power plants, and for the security, clean up and management of the eternal quagmire of nuclear waste that they have created.

see also: Nuclear Power = Crime Against Humanity


Nuclear and radiation accidents

The abandoned city of Prypiat, Ukraine, following the Chernobyl disaster. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is in the background.
@Wikipedia -

Chernobyl Disaster

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accidents


Pathways from airborne radioactive contamination to man
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons

Nuclear and radiation accidents
Lists of nuclear disasters and radioactive incidents

Nuclear power plant accidents [partial] chart from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of civilian nuclear accidents
List of military nuclear accidents



Nuclear Power Industry is a Crime Against Humanity!
(Letter from Francis Boyle @media with conscience news.net)

Dear Friends: I have now had the opportunity to review my information sources. I have already sent to you the basic thrust of my analysis: Namely, that the Japanese Nuclear Power Industry constitutes a Crime against Humanity as defined by Article 7 of the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court, to which Japan is a party. The same holds true for the Nuclear Power Industries in all the other countries of the World. You have the text of Rome Statute Article 7 below, which is directly on point...(-more)
Article 7
Crimes against humanity

1. For the purpose of this Statute, "crime against humanity" means any of the following acts when committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack:….
(k) Other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health.

2. For the purpose of paragraph 1:
(a) "Attack directed against any civilian population" means a course of conduct involving the multiple commission of acts referred to in paragraph 1 against any civilian population, pursuant to or in furtherance of a State or organizational policy to commit such attack; ….

Francis A. Boyle
Professor of International Law
University of Illinois College of Law

more (this blog)


Tiny Nukes - How dangerous are small doses of radiation?

In 1945, a profoundly sad experiment in public health began when U.S. forces dropped a 13-kiloton nuclear fission bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three years later, President Harry Truman ordered the National Academy of Sciences to study the long-term health effects of radiation on roughly 100,000 survivors. (A hundred thousand more perished in the blast and its immediate aftermath.) As the most rigorous research of its kind (no longitudinal study of the Chernobyl disaster's survivors was ever done), the Life Span Study of the Hiroshima cohort now guides almost all responses to major radiation disasters, including the recent near-meltdown at the Fukushima reactor in Japan. Yet its findings seem to have been ignored completely in the breathless reporting, over the past few weeks, of radiation contamination across the United States.

Within days of the tsunami, the nation's potassium iodide pills—which counteract the effects of radioactive iodine—sold out. The Food and Drug Administration banned vegetable and milk imports from provinces near the reactor. Just the other day, the Environmental Protection Agency reported that traces of cesium-137 had been found in milk in Vermont, while elevated levels of other radioactive isotopes were showing up in samples from Phoenix and Los Angeles. And more than a dozen cities have detected radiation in their drinking water. Despite reassurances that elevated levels of other radioactive isotopes in milk and drinking water are not dangerous, some health departments are still advising cautionary measures, like a blanket avoidance of drinking rainwater...




All Things Nuclear
A project of the Union of Concerned Scientists


Internal NRC Documents Reveal Doubts about Safety Measures

APRIL 6, 2011: In the weeks following the Fukushima accident, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and nuclear industry officials have been asserting that US nuclear plants are better prepared to withstand a catastrophic event like the March 11 earthquake and tsunami than Japanese plants because they have additional safety measures in place.

According to internal NRC documents, however, there is no consensus within the NRC that US plants are sufficiently protected. The documents indicate that technical staff members doubt the effectiveness of key safety measures adopted after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

How Many Cancers Did Chernobyl Really Cause?

APRIL 6, 2011 | (click for updated APRIL 17, 2011)

There is a lot of confusion about how many excess cancer deaths will likely result from the 1986 Chernobyl accident in Ukraine. As we see below, 70,000 and 35,000 are reasonable estimates of the number of excess cancers and cancer deaths attributable to the accident.

Much lower numbers of cancers and deaths are often cited, but these are misleading because they only apply to those populations with the highest radiation exposures, and don’t take into account the larger numbers of people who were exposed to less radiation.

...people frequently cite “4,000” as the number of eventual excess cancer fatalities. However, by limiting its analysis to people with the greatest exposure to released radiation, the report seriously underestimates the number of cancers and cancer deaths attributable to Chernobyl. The effects of the radiation were not limited to the “contaminated” areas but would be felt in Europe and beyond.

The current understanding of the relationship of cancer to radiation is that the risk of cancer increases linearly with dose and that there is no safe amount of radiation. This understanding is represented by the “Linear No-Threshold” (LNT) model of cancer.


Chernobyl Disaster @ wikipedia

An exhibit at the Ukrainian National Chernobyl Museum. Mutations in both humans and other animals may have increased as a result of the disaster.

Chernobyl radiation map



NEWS


Environmental Watchdog Criticizes Iowa Legislature for Passing Sweetheart Nuclear Deal
FRIENDS OF EARTH | Energy | Tuesday, April 26, 2011
Contact: Kelly Trout, 202-222-0722, ktrout@foe.org

DES MOINES, IOWA―Today the Iowa House voted to approve controversial legislation that would pave the way for MidAmerican to raise consumers' electricity rates to pay for the construction of a new nuclear reactor regardless of whether or not the reactor is ever built.

In response, Friends of the Earth President Erich Pica made the following statement:

“With this vote, legislators ignored the will of the people. Polling shows that 75 percent of Iowans oppose this move to raise electricity rates so MidAmerican can build a new nuclear reactor. We look to the Senate to listen to the will of the people and not to the avarice of MidAmerican.”

See: New Poll Shows Iowans Oppose Paying for New Nuclear Reactor


Civil Disobedience & Arrests at Livermore Labs

Indymedia East Bay News (Mon Apr 25 2011): Good Friday/Earth Day Protest at the Livermore Nuclear Weapons Laboratory

Livermore Lab was founded to develop the hydrogen bomb, and new weapons of mass destruction are still designed there. For more than 25 years, people of faith and others concerned about the proliferation of nuclear weapons have gathered on Good Friday outside the Livermore Laboratory. This year Good Friday and Earth Day coincided.

To protest the continued development of nuclear weapons in the Bay Area and the United States, a demonstration called "For the Beauty of the Earth: Good Friday, Earth Day & The Bomb, The Cross in the Midst of Creation" was held at Livermore Nuclear Lab in Livermore on April 22nd. At dawn, an interfaith prayer service was followed by Stations of the Cross. The demonstration ended at the front gate with the mass arrest of approximately two dozen protesters who refused to stop blocking the entrance when ordered to by police.


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U.S. Nuclear Weapons Industry


Locked-Out Uranium Processing Workers Protest Honeywell’s Use of Scab Workers at Uranium Enrichment Plant in Illinois

Honeywell plead guilty last month to illegally storing hazardous radioactive waste without a permit

Dozens of workers protested at Honeywell’s shareholder meeting on Monday, accusing the company of putting employees and the public in danger at its uranium enrichment plant in Metropolis, Illinois. Major U.S. defense contractor, Honeywell, pleaded guilty last month to illegally storing hazardous radioactive waste without a permit. The company kept highly radioactive mud in drums in the open air behind its facility near the Ohio River. Workers at the facility say they notified Honeywell of the problem on many occasions. Many are members of the United Steelworkers union and feel this particular incident led to the company’s desire to bust their union. More than 200 workers at the Metropolis plant have been out of work since last June due to stalled contract negotiations with the company on workplace safety, economic and seniority issues. We speak with labor journalist Mike Elk, who has covered this story extensively for In These Times magazine. [includes rush transcript]



INVESTING IN NUKES

Greenpeace activists protest in various BNP offices in Rome, asking to stop nuclear investments. Jan 11, 2011 © Greenpeace / Francesca Bellini


KANSAS CITY (June 14, 2010): GSA signs final deal for new Honeywell nuclear weapons parts facility

The federal government signed a lease today with the developer of a new Honeywell nuclear weapons parts plant, and private financing is expected to be finalized soon...


Excellent Investment Opportunities In Nuclear And Uranium Stocks
THE MARKET ORACLE | Companies / Uranium | Mar 19, 2011
There's an old saying in investing: Buy a winter coat in the summer.

Uranium stocks are certainly out of season and deeply discounted. Media coverage has shifted from the destruction of the earthquake to the negative aspects of nuclear energy. Nothing puts fear into the public more than green men in radiation outfits. The media has taken this opportunity to capitalize on the fear of the masses. This has resulted in devastating sell-offs in the uranium mining sector such as in uranium (Global X Uranium ETF (URA)) and nuclear energy ETFs (Market Vectors Uranium+Nuclear Energy ETF (NLR)), which has seen its most severe decline in its short history. - One needs to separate the facts from the fiction as the one-sided coverage often signals that a shakeout may be occurring. Potassium Iodine tablets being hoarded in South America is a testament to the media inducing one of the greatest hysterias that I have seen in my lifetime. The fire sale in uranium stocks may be providing an excellent opportunity to enter this market or to add to positions.


U.S. nuclear investment to pause: analysts
NEW YORK | Thu Mar 31, 2011 10:10pm EDT
(Reuters) - Plans for nuclear power investment in the United States will be sidelined but not derailed by the problems Japan is having with the Fukushima nuclear plant, experts said in a panel discussion..

The state of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors after the March 11 earthquake and ensuing tsunami has rekindled the debate over whether the benefits of nuclear power outweigh the risks.

As Japan struggles to regain control of the damaged nuclear plant north of Tokyo, licensing and financing for new nuclear projects in the United States will be put on hold, according to former regulators and other experts assembled on a panel sponsored by the New York Society of Security Analysts.

"I think there will be limited impact on new plant development," said James Asselstine, a managing director at Barclays Capital and former member of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.



LINKS TO CHECK OUT
Ace Hoffman Nuclear power reports

The Code Killers by Ace Hoffman

Ace Hoffman's Links page - featuring collected animations and essays such as:
Nuclear power plants and other large nuclear facilities in the United States
Operating or closed - Including their individual histories, locations, technical details, official contact points, and local activist groups.

Nuclear Power Plant Illustraions
Poison Fire USA - visual chronology of nuclear events 1941-present
Shut San Onofre
and more!


Pacifica Nuclear Teach-in

Democracy Now! on YouTube - Japan in Crisis


Nuclear Power Industry is a Crime Against Humanity! whats up: Nuclear Power Crimes Against Humanity & Environment
ROME STATUTE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT
Article 7: Crimes against humanity



See also
whats up: Nuclear Power Crimes Against Humanity & Environment
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